Political Rant

Photo via Amazon.com
Photo via Amazon.com

2016 is going to be a pivotal year. A culmination of five years of exponential expansion of LGBT rights. 2011 marked the end of DADT. In 2013 DOMA was ruled unconstitutional. Then, in 2015, marriage equality was made the rule of the land. Little by little our country has been chipping away at its last vestiges of legalized discrimination. Sixty years ago my parents could not marry in the state they lived in because they were of different races. Today, that seems unbelievable to most. Until last year I could not marry my wife in most states because legally we were of the same sex. Just a year later, it’s hard to imagine not having this right. This year, I can marry whomever I want, but I cannot legally use the bathroom consistent with my gender identity in some states. While, we still have a ways to go, I am hopeful that a year from now, we will all be celebrating the elimination of socially and legally accepted discrimination in the United States.

As ridiculous as this seems, there are many out there who are desperate to ensure that my right to pee, rent, and work are dependent on me conforming to the majority’s definition of gender. But, just as bathroom restrictions for people of different races were ultimately determined to be unconstitutional, so will be restrictions based on gender identity. If not by our current Supreme Court, then certainly by one in the near future. The President who is elected this year will likely choose 2 or 3 Supreme Court justices, who ultimately will decide our future. We need to vote in November, and we need to vote wisely. Our lives depend on it.

Tygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabyoutubeTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabtwitterTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabtumblrTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabpinterestTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabinstagramTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabfacebookTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabemail
Tygh Lawrence-Clarke
Tygh Lawrence-Clarke is a transman. He was born in Beverly Hills, CA and was raised by a single mother, who was a prominent physician. His family moved to Las Vegas when he was 11, where he remained for most of his life. He retired in 2011 from the Pharmacy field to become a stay at home Dad. He now lives in the woods of New Hampshire with his wife, son and his menagerie of pets. Since his transition, Tygh now spends his free time advocating for the transgender community. He has a Youtube channel where he documents his transition and makes educational videos. He, with the help of his wife, is also working with a nonprofit organization called 41%, which strives to pair people in the transgender community with supportive volunteer peers in an effort to address the suicide problem. Despite the challenges Tygh faces every day, he couldn't be happier now that he is living his life as his true self.
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Tygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabyoutubeTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabtwitterTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabtumblrTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabpinterestTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabinstagramTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabfacebookTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabemail
Tygh Lawrence-Clarke
Tygh Lawrence-Clarke is a transman. He was born in Beverly Hills, CA and was raised by a single mother, who was a prominent physician. His family moved to Las Vegas when he was 11, where he remained for most of his life. He retired in 2011 from the Pharmacy field to become a stay at home Dad. He now lives in the woods of New Hampshire with his wife, son and his menagerie of pets. Since his transition, Tygh now spends his free time advocating for the transgender community. He has a Youtube channel where he documents his transition and makes educational videos. He, with the help of his wife, is also working with a nonprofit organization called 41%, which strives to pair people in the transgender community with supportive volunteer peers in an effort to address the suicide problem. Despite the challenges Tygh faces every day, he couldn't be happier now that he is living his life as his true self.