All posts by Tygh Lawrence-Clarke

Tygh Lawrence-Clarke is a transman. He was born in Beverly Hills, CA and was raised by a single mother, who was a prominent physician. His family moved to Las Vegas when he was 11, where he remained for most of his life. He retired in 2011 from the Pharmacy field to become a stay at home Dad. He now lives in the woods of New Hampshire with his wife, son and his menagerie of pets. Since his transition, Tygh now spends his free time advocating for the transgender community. He has a Youtube channel where he documents his transition and makes educational videos. He, with the help of his wife, is also working with a nonprofit organization called 41%, which strives to pair people in the transgender community with supportive volunteer peers in an effort to address the suicide problem. Despite the challenges Tygh faces every day, he couldn't be happier now that he is living his life as his true self.

Stay Visible…Drop A Card

north-carolina-lgbt-controversy-040216
Photo by Associated Press/Skip Foreman

The recent protests in Charlotte and other cities in our country area is a great reminder that we cannot be complacent and simply stand by waiting for change to happen, because as we wait, more people are dying. While the current fight is for race equality, the same battles exist for all minorities, not the least of which is the transgender community.

I have the greatest respect for people who risk everything in attending protests, but not everyone has the ability or willingness to do so. Fortunately, there are other ways to effect change, and while less dramatic and slower, still move us forward.

logosm

For the transgender community, visibility is key. Most of the world has no knowledge of our existence, or if they do, it is based on misunderstanding and prejudice.

One way to enhance visibility is to announce your presence in the room, the building, the community, and the world. Obviously, most of us cannot do this as directly as we would like, due to safety concerns.

3075664_orig

But, most of us have opportunities nearly every day to drop a note or a card, anonymously if necessary, leaving a message that we are sharing space in this world. The Transgender Encounter Project (TEP) was started to promote such opportunities.

There is a map on our website where you can mark where you have dropped your cards, so that you and the rest of us can see acknowledgement of where we are in the world. Please take the time to participate. Let’s cover the map!

Click here to learn more about the project!

 

 

Am I Trans Enough?

Blogger and cover model Tygh at our table at the 2016 Philadelphia Trans Health Conference!
Blogger and cover model Tygh at our table at the 2016 Philadelphia Trans Health Conference!

Am I trans enough?

That’s a loaded question, so let me start by defining Transgender.

Transgender is an umbrella term that includes all people whose authentic identity does not conform to typical stereotypes of male or female genders. However, some parts of the trans community define transgender as having transitioned in some way. Unfortunately the language that is often used by the community is exclusionary. Some people feel it is acceptable to question the authenticity of trans people, and imply that you are only transgender if you present a certain way, take hormones, and get certain surgeries. As if there is only one way to be transgender!

Photo via huffingtonpost.com
Photo via huffingtonpost.com

Transgender is simply a label, but emphasizing labels is divisive rather than inclusive. Labels, I hate them. Not everyone feels the need to transition completely or partially, and some do not chose to transition at all.There should not be specific criteria associated with identifying as transgender.

I have to think about labels regarding my gender. I don’t know what box to check because I’m a little bit of this and I’m a little bit of that. Labels are pointless. I hate them. Many of us don’t fit into neat boxes. We aren’t one particular gender and we don’t neatly fit under the familiar umbrella.
There are so many labels, but still none seem to really fit. Labels work really well for inanimate objects that don’t have the ability to adapt and change. But, when it comes to me and my life, labels fall short. Labels are wrong. I hate them. I’m not a woman, I’m not a man, I’m not a this or a that. I’m not a who, a which or a what. I am me and I am trans enough.

Transgender should be a label of self-identification, and there is no right or wrong way to be trans. Therefore we are all trans enough.

Political Rant

Photo via Amazon.com
Photo via Amazon.com

2016 is going to be a pivotal year. A culmination of five years of exponential expansion of LGBT rights. 2011 marked the end of DADT. In 2013 DOMA was ruled unconstitutional. Then, in 2015, marriage equality was made the rule of the land. Little by little our country has been chipping away at its last vestiges of legalized discrimination. Sixty years ago my parents could not marry in the state they lived in because they were of different races. Today, that seems unbelievable to most. Until last year I could not marry my wife in most states because legally we were of the same sex. Just a year later, it’s hard to imagine not having this right. This year, I can marry whomever I want, but I cannot legally use the bathroom consistent with my gender identity in some states. While, we still have a ways to go, I am hopeful that a year from now, we will all be celebrating the elimination of socially and legally accepted discrimination in the United States.

As ridiculous as this seems, there are many out there who are desperate to ensure that my right to pee, rent, and work are dependent on me conforming to the majority’s definition of gender. But, just as bathroom restrictions for people of different races were ultimately determined to be unconstitutional, so will be restrictions based on gender identity. If not by our current Supreme Court, then certainly by one in the near future. The President who is elected this year will likely choose 2 or 3 Supreme Court justices, who ultimately will decide our future. We need to vote in November, and we need to vote wisely. Our lives depend on it.

Tygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabyoutubeTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabtwitterTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabtumblrTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabpinterestTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabinstagramTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabfacebookTygh Lawrence-Clarke on sabemail
Tygh Lawrence-Clarke
Tygh Lawrence-Clarke is a transman. He was born in Beverly Hills, CA and was raised by a single mother, who was a prominent physician. His family moved to Las Vegas when he was 11, where he remained for most of his life. He retired in 2011 from the Pharmacy field to become a stay at home Dad. He now lives in the woods of New Hampshire with his wife, son and his menagerie of pets. Since his transition, Tygh now spends his free time advocating for the transgender community. He has a Youtube channel where he documents his transition and makes educational videos. He, with the help of his wife, is also working with a nonprofit organization called 41%, which strives to pair people in the transgender community with supportive volunteer peers in an effort to address the suicide problem. Despite the challenges Tygh faces every day, he couldn't be happier now that he is living his life as his true self.